What One Database Marketing Company Knows About Me

It’s no surprise that marketing companies gather data about you to sell off to advertisers who then deliver targeted ads via mail, email, or while you surf the internet. Sometimes it’s even creepy how much they know about you. So far, it’s been a bit of a mystery finding out exactly how much of your information these companies have. A few days ago one marketing technology company, Acxiom, launched a new service called AboutTheData.com which allows people to take a peek into how much information the company has gathered on them.  Acxiom is no small marketing company. According to the NYTimes, it has created the world’s largest commercial database on consumers. I decided to give the service a try to see just how much data this company had about me.

Since this is such a large company, and I’m such an active internet user, I expected to find Acxiom to have gathered a lot of information about me. I was slightly disappointed–or relieved–when I found out that they didn’t have that much information on me at all (honestly, I don’t know how I should feel about this). Before going into the data, here is a little more information about where this data comes from and what we are shown.

According to Acxiom, this data is collected from:

  • Government records, public records and publicly available data – like data from telephone directories, website directories and postings, property and assessor files, and government issued licenses
  • Data from surveys and questionnaires consumers fill out
  • General data from other commercial entities where consumers have received notice of how data about them will be used, and offered a choice about whether or not to allow those uses – like demographic data

The data they show us, is their “core data”. This data is used to to generate the modeled insights and analytics used for marketing, which they do not show. Acxiom says that we are shown all of their core data. They make no mention about whether there is other non-core, non modeled insights data.

The site allows you to view data from six categories categories. Below is the information that has been gathered on me. Economic and Shopping data is over the past 24 months.

Characteristic Data: Male, Hispanic, inferred single
Home Data: No data.
Vehicle Data: No data.
Economic Data: Regular credit card holder (as opposed to Preimum/Gold), Regular Visa, 2 cash purchases (includes checks), 1 Visa purchase.
Shopping Data: $139 spent on 3 purchases (the ones referred to above?), 2 offline totalling $100, average $50 each (one purchase < $50, the other >$50, so I guess it’s a coincidence they add up to $100), 1 online for $39. My supposed interests include books, magazine, Christmas gift purchase, ethnic products (??), lifestyles, interests, and passions.
Households Interests Data: No data.

It makes sense that there is not be a lot of information about my home data or vehicle data, since I currently own neither (although there was no info on my previous vehicle ownership). Perhaps car and homeowners would have these sections filled out entirely. The household interests category is meant to include data related to interests of me or people in my household (examples given from the site include: gardening, traveling, sports). Not so surprised this is also empty, but I’m not sure why they guess that my shopping interests include ethnic products and yet they are not able to guess that I enjoy traveling. As for Characteristic Data? My Twitter feed should be enough to reveal that I’m a single male hispanic. Since you have to provide your name, email, address, and last 4 digits of your SSN, it’s pretty safe to assume that they also have this information.

**To skip Luis’ short history of shopping, jump to the next paragraph.
Economic and Shopping Data provide a little more hints as to where the data are coming from. First of all, they only have three purchases. That’s it. Out of the 3,100 card/check purchases I’ve made over the past 24 months, they have 3. I tried looking for two offline purchases on my Mint which add up to $100, but this proved to be a very difficult exercise. Even after filtering offline purchases and sorting data, there were too many possible combinations. For now, those two offline purchases remain a mystery. I was able to find a suspect for the online payment of $39. The most suspicious purchase came from a $39 seat upgrade at United Airlines. I can’t be sure if this is the one since I happened to buy a $39 upgrade, plus a plane ticket which does not show up in my AboutTheData. However, my suspicion arises from the fact that Mint had prepared a targeted ad for me by placing a green flashy dollar sign next to the purchase. This also could’ve been a coincidence.

Conclusions/Best Guesses
Given the fact that I spend A LOT of time on the internet and the high amount of purchases I’ve made over the years (I should cut down on those), I am surprised that Acxiom does not have more data about me. Basically, they know I’m a single, male, hispanic, and that’s about it. I can’t possibly imagine what they could gather from the rest of my data that’s worth $$$ to advertisers. Additionally, it seems a lot of their data comes from publicly available government data sets (home and car ownership), and–at least in my case–not a lot of data comes from neither my online habits or my shopping habits. I presume most of my important data is owned by Facebook and Google, and I’m pretty confident that they do not sell/share my data with Acxiom.

Last thought: AboutTheData let’s you edit your data so that you can receive more accurate targeted advertising. I’m curious to know who uses Acxiom data to target me, so I would’ve loved to enter distinctive preferences that do not apply to me (yet) such as “pregnancy”, “colonoscopies”, “underwater basket weaving”, or “Cook Islands National Women’s Football League” to see where these ads pop up. Unfortunately, AboutTheData only lets you change the above mentioned interests to ‘true’ or ‘false’. I guess they thought about the trolls.

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One Response to “What One Database Marketing Company Knows About Me”

  1. Legna Says:

    Surprisingly enough, they didn’t know about me!! Yey for me!

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