Posts Tagged ‘online community’

Reddit is NOT a failed state….

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

It has it’s problems for sure, but I wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss it as having failed.

I’m referring to a The Verge article posted about a month ago following the celebrity nude photo leaks. The main argument for FAIL is the fact that instead of chastising the users who help spread the leaked photos, Reddit protected them under the shield of free speech. I’m not here to argue whether Reddit acted appropriately or not in protecting the individuals (personally, they could’ve been kicked out, banned, arrested, and I would’ve been content with that). But I do not think this transgression in privacy, abuse of free speech, and overall disgusting behavior by a small group of a larger community a failed state makes.

Is this indicative of pervasive malicious behavior across Reddit? Absolutely. We didn’t need r/TheFappening to figure that out. Just talk to woman redditors about their experiences as participants.

But at least we’re talking about these issues. It’s not so much the fact that we are, it’s the fact that we have the ability to do so. Through their karma system, Reddit has built a system that promotes good behavior and–sometimes–reproves the bad. It’s a primitive system for sure, especially since it’s not immune to the hivemind behavior (for example, apparently the r/nyc hivemind thinks people have ZERO responsability to give up your seat in the subway for a pregnant woman (maybe they’re right and I’m wrong)). This system, I think, allows the hive to go through iterations of what they believe to be correct. In effect, every now and then it corrects itself. Take the terrible “detective work” conducted during the immediate aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. After the hive realized it was wrong (so wrong), whenever there was a post asking for some sort of crowdsourced detective work, it was often met with someone who commented on the terrible results that came out of the last time they tried to play detectives.  As a result, Reddit for the most part now knows: We should avoid digital vigilantism.

In the coming years we will increasingly see Nobel Prize winner Elinor Ostrom’s principles on governing the commons applied to digital spaces. Although primitively (and perhaps unintentionally) Reddit has created a space where communities are able to define their own boundaries, (sort of) align “governance” rules with their preferences, (kind of) ensure that those who participate in the community can have a say on the rules, and are (barely) able to sanction those who misbehave. It has a long way to go for sure. What happened with r/TheFappening is a case where a group of very misguided individuals were able to gather in one place and as a community behave inappropriately. In that case what Reddit might be lacking is some greater oversight over communities and their leaders. An oversight that’s not dictatorial, but rather an oversight that is also provided by a community (a council of communities?).

Another problem with Reddit (or any digital space, actually) is that whenever someone goes through the trouble of committing a crime–say stealing nude celeb photos–the “morality cost” of engaging in the immoral behavior is significantly decreased by the internet’s ability to massively distribute information at a significantly low cost. For the most part, the consequences for engaging in such immoral behavior do not exist. Especially when it costs nothing to click on a link. This is maybe one of the internet’s biggest weaknesses: it’s ability to facilitate engagement in immoral behavior.

We need to design digital spaces that somehow take this into account. Spaces where the community can more meaningfully participate and deal with the bad apples more effectively. Is Reddit, and the rest of the internet, full of misguided individuals who do some fucked up shit? Yes, but this doesn’t mean we need to take it to the back of the barn and shoot it. It means we need to think about how we create these digital spaces in the future. Or do away with it if you want, but then let’s take the good lessons and the bad, and let’s make something better.