Placemeter pays YOU for your data…

Note: I have set a new goal to post at least once a week, even if the posts are short.

Turns out you may have some data to offer that is actually more valuable than just your online shopping patterns: the view outside your window. Placemeter is a relatively new startup that pays New Yorkers up to $50 to place their phones against their windows and record movements on the street below. Using nifty computer vision algorithms, Placemeter extracts data from the images recorded by your phone. The short video below gives a sense of what they are trying to track.

The front page immediately addresses the issue of privacy. The company will not use the data to record anything that goes on inside your home, they will not use the data to identify people on the street, and the video they record isn’t stored. They only store raw data extracted from the video.

Their business model is simple: they pay you a little bit per month to record information which they will later sell to third parties. You provide the product they later sell (hey, at least they pay you for it). Since their goal is to sell data to businesses and city governments, they are mostly interested in views of restaurants, shops, or bars. This means lots of people like me can’t participate (I have a very lovely view of a wall). This got me thinking on who else can and can’t participate. If you happen to live in (and have a view of) Times Square, your view could be worth dozens of dollars! What about a view from a quiet Staten Island street? Or from the Bronx? Basically in order to participate you just have to live in the right place. A place that is probably expensive too.

One redditor applied to sell his/her view and was rejected because the street wasn’t busy enough, but that he/she would be considered when the company started “sending out unpaid meters”. I imagine this means the company would mail you a sensor for free and you would record data for them. If this happens I can see them shifting the rhetoric towards “help us analyse and improve your urban environment”, which this article already does.

Seeing as how the most valuable data would come from a select group of New Yorkers, most of their most valuable data might come from the already freely available video feeds around the city (they should fill out the survey for the OD500).

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